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Paris Nights and Other Impressions of Places and People

Enoch Arnold Bennett (27 May 1867 - 27 March 1931) was an English writer. He is best known as a novelist, but he also worked in other fields such as the theatre, journalism, propaganda and films. Bennett was born in a modest house in Hanley in the Potteries district of Staffordshire. Hanley was o...

by Arnold Bennett

added by Another Chapter Publishing
1 year ago

The Substitute Millionaire

Jack Norman had no idea he was Silas Gyde's sole heir—until the multimillionaire was killed by an anarchist's bomb and Jack found himself the richest man in New York. The inheritance included a warning from his benefactor about an elaborate protection scheme promising to protect the wealthy from ...

by Hulbert Footner

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Eleven

Sandra Cisneros' Eleven is a powerful piece about the struggle of a young girl named Rachel on her eleventh birthday.

by Sandra Cisneros

added by acronimous
1 year ago

The Monkey's Paw

"The Monkey's Paw" is a supernatural short story by author W. W. Jacobs first published in England in the collection The Lady of the Barge in 1902.

by W. W. Jacobs

added by acronimous
1 year ago

THE SELF CRITICISM OF SCIENCE: ALEXIS KARPOUZOS

The essays that follow are taken from a series of lectures given by the spiritual teacher and author, alexis karpouzos, in autumn of 2010 in Athens.

by ALEXIS KARPOUZOS

added by invisible_t
1 year ago

THE END OF CERTAINTY

The essays on this book are the notes from the e – learning courses that were given by the thinker and author Alexis Karpouzos during the winter of 2012.

by ALEXIS KARPOUZOS

added by alexiskarpouzos
1 year ago

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885.

by Mark Twain

added by acronimous
1 year ago

The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas completed in 1844. It is one of the author's most popular works, along with The Three Musketeers.

by Alexandre Dumas

added by acronimous
1 year ago

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

"An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" is a short story by the American writer and Civil War veteran Ambrose Bierce.

by Ambrose Bierce

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Treasure Island

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold".

by Robert Louis Stevenson

added by acronimous
1 year ago

A Little Princess

A Little Princess is a children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, first published as a book in 1905.

by Frances Hodgson Burnett

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Emma

Emma, by Jane Austen, is a novel about youthful hubris and the perils of misconstrued romance. The story takes place in the fictional village of Highbury and the surrounding estates of Hartfield, Randalls, and Donwell Abbey and involves the relationships among individuals in those locations consi...

by Jane Austen

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Iliad

The Iliad is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and t...

by Homer

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Don Quixote

The Ingenious Nobleman Sir Quixote of La Mancha, or just Don Quixote, is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes.

by Miguel de Cervantes

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Republic

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue, written by Plato around 380 BC, concerning justice, the order and character of the just, city-state, and the just man.

by Plato

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Candide

Candide, ou l'Optimisme, is a French satire first published in 1759 by Voltaire, a philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment.

by Voltaire

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Siddhartha

Siddhartha is a novel by Hermann Hesse that deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery of a man named Siddhartha during the time of the Gautama Buddha. The book, Hesse's ninth novel, was written in German, in a simple, lyrical style.

by Hermann Hesse

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Leaves of Grass

Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). Although the first edition was published in 1855, Whitman spent most of his professional life writing and re-writing Leaves of Grass, revising it multiple times until his death. This resulted in vastly different...

by Walt Whitman

added by acronimous
1 year ago

A Modest Proposal

A Modest Proposal For preventing the Children of Poor People From being a Burthen to Their Parents or Country, and For making them Beneficial to the Publick, commonly referred to as A Modest Proposal, is a Juvenalian satirical essay written and published anonymously by Jonathan Swift in 1729.

by Jonathan Swift

added by acronimous
1 year ago

The Yellow Wallpaper

"The Yellow Wallpaper" is a short story by American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine.

by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Metamorphosis

he Metamorphosis (German: Die Verwandlung) is a novella written by Franz Kafka which was first published in 1915.

by Franz Kafka

added by acronimous
1 year ago

A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities is a historical novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution.

by Charles Dickens

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Moby-Dick

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is sailor Ishmael's narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the white whale that on the ship's previous voyage bit off Ahab's leg at the knee.

by Herman Melville

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Othello

Othello is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1603. It is based on the story Un Capitano Moro by Cinthio, a disciple of Boccaccio, first published in 1565.

by William Shakespeare

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Les Misérables

Les Misérables is a French historical novel by Victor Hugo, first published in 1862, that is considered one of the greatest novels of the 19th century. In the English-speaking world, the novel is usually referred to by its original French title.

by Victor Hugo

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Peter Pan

Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up or Peter and Wendy is J. M. Barrie's most famous work, in the form of a 1904 play and a 1911 novel.

by J. M. Barrie

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Heart of Darkness

Heart of Darkness is a novella by Polish-British novelist Joseph Conrad, about a voyage up the Congo River into the Congo Free State, in the heart of Africa, by the story's narrator Charles Marlow.

by Joseph Conrad

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Dracula

Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It introduced Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead ...

by Bram Stoker

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice is a romantic novel by Jane Austen, first published in 1813. The story charts the emotional development of the protagonist, Elizabeth Bennet, who learns the error of making hasty judgments and comes to appreciate the difference between the superficial and the essential. The co...

by Jane Austen

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Shooting an Elephant

"Shooting an Elephant" is an essay by George Orwell, first published in the literary magazine New Writing in late 1936 and broadcast by the BBC Home Service on 12 October 1948.

by George Orwell

added by acronimous
1 year ago

The Irrational Knot

The Irrational Knot was first published in 1905, having been written in 1880. Within a framework of leisure class preoccupations and frivolities Shaw disdains hereditary status and proclaims the nobility of workers. Marriage, as the knot in question, is exemplified by the union of Marian Lind, a ...

by George Bernard Shaw

added by acronimous
1 year ago

The Treasure

The Treasure is a 1904 novel by the Swedish writer Selma Lagerlof. Its original Swedish title is Herr Arnes penningar, which means "Mr. Arne's money". It has also been published in English as Herr Arne's Hoard. Set in Bohuslän in the 16th century, it tells the story of a group of Scotti...

by Selma Lagerlof

added by davidb
1 year ago

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