The Lion and the Gnat book cover

The Lion and the Gnat

"The Lion and the Gnat" is a fable by Aesop that underscores the idea that physical size isn't always synonymous with power. It tells the story of an arrogant lion and a seemingly insignificant gnat. Brimming with confidence, the gnat challenges the lion, saying it won't concede even if it were defeated. Much to the lion's embarrassment, the gnat enters its nose and stings its insides, leaving the lion roaring in pain. The fable conveys the message that no creature is too small to win against the mightiest.

Genre: Children
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"Away with you, vile insect!" said a Lion angrily to a Gnat that was buzzing around his head. But the Gnat was not in the least disturbed. "Do you think," he said spitefully to the Lion, "that I am afraid of you because they call you king?" The next instant he flew at the Lion and stung him sharply on the nose. Mad with rage, the Lion struck fiercely at the Gnat, but only succeeded in tearing himself with his claws. Again and again the Gnat stung the Lion, who now was roaring terribly. At last, worn out with rage and covered with wounds that his own teeth and claws had made, the Lion gave up the fight. The Gnat buzzed away to tell the whole world about his victory, but instead he flew straight into a spider's web. And there, he who had defeated the King of beasts came to a miserable end, the prey of a little spider. The least of our enemies is often the most to be feared. Pride over a success should not throw us off our guard.
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Aesop

Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller and fabulist, known for his collection of fables. His fables often featured animals as characters and conveyed moral lessons or wisdom through short narratives. Some of his most famous fables include "The Tortoise and the Hare," "The Boy Who Cried Wolf," and "The Fox and the Grapes." These timeless stories continue to be widely read and adapted to this day. more…

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