The Man and the Satyr book cover

The Man and the Satyr

The Man and the Satyr by Aesop is a fable that presents a story about a satyr who was befriended by a man. Over time, the satyr becomes confused and bothered by the man's ability to blow hot (to warmth his hands) and cold (to cool his soup) from his mouth. The story ends in their friendship being annulled due to the Satyr's inability to trust someone who can do such contradictory actions. The fable ultimately delivers a lesson about hypocrisy and inconsistency in human behavior.


Genre: Children
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A long time ago a Man met a Satyr in the forest and succeeded in making friends with him. The two soon became the best of comrades, living together in the Man's hut. But one cold winter evening, as they were walking homeward, the Satyr saw the Man blow on his fingers. "Why do you do that?" asked the Satyr. "To warm my hands," the Man replied. When they reached home the Man prepared two bowls of porridge. These he placed steaming hot on the table, and the comrades sat down very cheerfully to enjoy the meal. But much to the Satyr's surprise, the Man began to blow into his bowl of porridge. "Why do you do that?" he asked. "To cool my porridge," replied the Man. The Satyr sprang hurriedly to his feet and made for the door. "Goodby," he said, "I've seen enough. A fellow that blows hot and cold in the same breath cannot be friends with me!" The man who talks for both sides is not to be trusted by either. [Illustration: THE MAN AND THE SATYR] [Illustration]
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Aesop

Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller and fabulist, known for his collection of fables. His fables often featured animals as characters and conveyed moral lessons or wisdom through short narratives. Some of his most famous fables include "The Tortoise and the Hare," "The Boy Who Cried Wolf," and "The Fox and the Grapes." These timeless stories continue to be widely read and adapted to this day. more…

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