The Mice and the Weasels book cover

The Mice and the Weasels

The Mice and the Weasels is a fable by Aesop that portrays the conflict between two species; mice and weasels. The mice, realizing they are constantly at a disadvantage against the weasels, decide to equip themselves with horns for protection. However, the horns end up being more of a burden, causing the mice to get trapped and killed more frequently. The story carries a cautionary message about the dangers of unnecessary boastfulness and the ill-judged imitation of the powerful.

Genre: Children
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The Weasels and the Mice were always up in arms against each other. In every battle the Weasels carried off the victory, as well as a large number of the Mice, which they ate for dinner next day. In despair the Mice called a council, and there it was decided that the Mouse army was always beaten because it had no leaders. So a large number of generals and commanders were appointed from among the most eminent Mice. To distinguish themselves from the soldiers in the ranks, the new leaders proudly bound on their heads lofty crests and ornaments of feathers or straw. Then after long preparation of the Mouse army in all the arts of war, they sent a challenge to the Weasels. The Weasels accepted the challenge with eagerness, for they were always ready for a fight when a meal was in sight. They immediately attacked the Mouse army in large numbers. Soon the Mouse line gave way before the attack and the whole army fled for cover. The privates easily slipped into their holes, but the Mouse leaders could not squeeze through the narrow openings because of their head-dresses. Not one escaped the teeth of the hungry Weasels. Greatness has its penalties.
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Aesop

Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller and fabulist, known for his collection of fables. His fables often featured animals as characters and conveyed moral lessons or wisdom through short narratives. Some of his most famous fables include "The Tortoise and the Hare," "The Boy Who Cried Wolf," and "The Fox and the Grapes." These timeless stories continue to be widely read and adapted to this day. more…

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